SEO for Kids, Facebook for Retailers, and Correct Spelling for Everyone

Good Content Practices Help with SEO

If you need a boost of happiness and straight content merchandising doesn’t bring a delirious grin to your face, head over to Chad Pollitt’s blog for a bit of both. He mixes the nitty-gritty details of content’s role in SEO with an adorable photo of his daughters, via a Chuck E. Cheese analogy. Those colorful round balls in the playpens are like content, he says. Would you prefer more or fewer balls? (To this I would add: the balls will not attract a crowd if they are gray or flat. You need colorful, exciting content for this to work.)

Get a dose of perspective and happiness at kunocreative.com/blog.

Facebook Offers Retailers More Than Just a Like Button

Like the layers of an onion, Facebook connects users to products on many different levels. Jeff Ente on Mashable offers a great guide to how businesses can use the social media giant to effectively sell product. Aside from the like button, companies can add a permission-based plugin on their site that incorporates birthday and “like” information (for an example, see Amazon) for highly personalized recommendations. Businesses can also open a storefront within their Facebook page that will either direct the user to their e-commerce site or allow them to complete the transaction then and there. Ente closes the article acknowledging the social media site’s trouble-ridden privacy issues and less-than-optimal selling platform, and the big question of whether F-commerce is the next new thing, or whether the whole idea stinks.

Read the discussion at mashable.com.

How Do You Spell “Successful E-Commerce”?

According to Charles Duncombe, successful British online retailer, a simple spelling mistake can throw your carefully prepared content out the window. Sean Coughlan of the BBC reports that Duncombe measured how much people spent on his tightsplease.co.uk site before and after a spelling error was fixed. He found that revenue per customer was twice as high with the spelling error removed. The only question that remains: will you spell it color, or colour?

Read the full story at bbc.co.uk.