The Style and Purpose of Written Content

What is the secret to great written content? Seth Godin gives us this advice: write naked (translate this as “be concise”). In a sentence, this means cutting out cliches, extra words, long words, passive words, and scientific or jargon-y words. It can be scary to go naked, but Seth suggests that fear is one of the primary causes of terrible writing. He directs this primarily at business writers, but these concepts apply to all writing. Don’t be afraid to tell your customers what it is or who it’s for.

Read the full story at sethgodin.typepad.com

Why bother with great written content, anyway? On Business Insider, contributor David Mercer offers a marketing perspective on why content is–still–king. He writes that advertising is a quick fix, and has a small shelf life compared to solid, well-thought-out content. His suggestion is relevant, useful, valuable content that can educate consumers. That sounds familiar.

Read the full story at businessinsider.com

Mike Moran, on Search Engine Guide, draws our attention to why it is important that people like your content. (Did that make you think of Facebook?) Whether search engines (*cough* Google *cough*) use Facebook likes or +1s in their rankings or not, as Mike suggests, it is still important to create content that people will stick around to read and naturally link to.

Read the full story at searchengineguide.com

If you think your brick-and-mortar store is safe from the need for content, mobile mania should cause you to think again. According to a study by Econsultancy and Toluna, 19 percent of UK consumers had researched products while out shopping. With the Amazon app, consumers can scan a bar code to check prices and see reviews. How your products are displayed on Amazon will have a crucial role as smart phone use continues to rise.

Read the full story at econsultancy.com